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Flyfishing Carp

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing' started by Madfisher, Aug 31, 2016.

  1. Madfisher

    Madfisher Active Member

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    With the demise of Trout in most central tablelands streams, and to cull their numbers I started flyfishing for carp.
    At first it was just to get some practice in so as not to disgrace myself at the annual Sofala carp comp.
    What I found when targeted in clear feestone streams like the Turon and Wuinburdale rivers was a really underated sport fish.
    Lets look at this further
    1. They can be sight fished to, often with their backs or tails out of the water in the shallows
    2 They demand skill, as your accuracy has to be spot on, so that they see the fly, but not so close as to they spook
    3, They will take a wide variety of flies or soft plastics
    4. Once hooked they go harder then any trout, and will stretch 12lb tippet to the limit if their are snags around.
    5 They are easily found as they are in plague proportions inmany streams and lakes.
    6 They can be big. IN the Winburdale they average only 5 to 7 lb, with the odd double fiq fish towards the top of their range. But in the Turon a 15lber barely gets a 2nd look. To win the comp you need close to 20lb to secure it.
    I started out using a stiff old 8wt rod I use for big windy yellas and Cod,but theses days use a med action 6wt with a floating line. Presentation of the fly is everything.
    Now I removed close on 300 carp from the Winburdale river in one season, which made a big difference to water quality, so go for it guys. Anyone wanting advice, feel free to ask.
    Cheers Pete
     
  2. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    Very informative post! Your statement regarding their fighting ability comes as no surprise to me! I have intended to take up fly fishing for a while now...with the idea of starting off on carp. When I do get around to it, I think I may be happy just chasing carp.
    cheers
    Team Bender
    The nemesis of carp!
     
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  3. Madfisher

    Madfisher Active Member

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    Mate go for it, the only thing you will need to work on is accuracy, far more then Trout. For suitable carp flies pink woolly buggars, dark woolly worms and large size 8 or 10 nymphs work well.
    good luck, mate go forv it.
    Cheers Pete
     
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  4. Hen and Chook

    Hen and Chook Active Member

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    Great information once again Pete.

    Chook1965
     
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  5. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    G'day Pete

    Yes, carp on any gear can be tough. I've tangled with plenty on fly in the Queanbeyan River while we lived there. The river was only 50 metres from home. I've also lost plenty under the willows because I simply couldn't stop them. AS you say, they are easy to sight fish to, but not near as silly as some might think. Old fisho
     
  6. Madfisher

    Madfisher Active Member

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    good to hear from you Noel. I hope you are keeping well.
    cheers Pete
     
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  7. westyonline

    westyonline death to the mud guzzlers

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    A bit of a thread dig, but.
    If you can catch big ol carp and land them on fly, you can catch just about any land based quarry
    They are very wily, fight strong and hard, and are very abundant
    I prefer to catch trout on spinners anyway!
     
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  8. Madfisher

    Madfisher Active Member

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    Problem is, our once great trout streams are no longer capable of carrying trout, due tro hotter summers, and willow removal, but carp are everywhere. And they can be extremely challenging to hook and land. We have switched to fly fishing our lakes for trout at the moment and are catching trout to 5lb,but I still prefer sight fishing for carp.
     
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  9. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    Is anything being done to try and rehabilitate the streams? Funding was announced last November in Vic for stream side works...I think to prolong the trout population in them. Honestly, I think we just have to face reality that some trout fisheries will be lost and it doesn't concern me but I think work should be done to produce healthier waterways for whatever fish resides in there!
    Cheers
    Jim
     
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  10. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Our trout streams problems have a simple answer, but an impossible solution. The water is being taken before it reaches them. Pete's right about warmer summers. But flowing streams are less affected by temperatures than small streams that are declining in volume by the year. The slower flow also increases the ability of weeds and reeds to develop, further slowing the flow. I can cite two not far from where we lived in Queanbeyan, that were once blue ribbon waters. Now they hardly flow. I recently saw the old river where I grew up (if I ever did) and was shattered by its appearance. Pools that were once 100 metres long are now down to twenty. Many of these waters flowed well before willow trees were established. Now they hardly flow at all. Willows do as much harm as good to waters. Hobby farmers have added greatly to the number of dams keeping water from reaching these streams, with no commercial value from the water taken. Carp are blamed for the destruction of rivers too. They are of course a problem, but when I see the Tumut River, which runs hard and fast; it has not been destroyed by the thousands of huge carp therein. We saw the Avon River, which becomes the Swan and flows to Fremantle, at a place called Toodyay. It was just a cess pit of slime and algae, so polluted by chemical run off; nothing could live in it. The locals were trying to get more trees planted to restore it. Restore what? Scattered around the valley hills were hundreds of these little hobby farm dams, and every one of them has contributed in a positive way, to the destruction of this once great river by taking its water. Many streams reach the ocean. This problem will snowball and start to have the same disastrous effect on our estuaries. And there is more and worse to come as populations increase and towns spread. What this increasing population will do for water in the future is beyond me. It's not going to be good. We can't just pump artesian water forever. It took millions of years to create. We can drain it in a lifetime or two as we have already seen in places. With rising sea levels we can desalinate, but at great cost. Every time we dam or divert water to a dam or storage; we are reducing the natural flow that made the stream what it once was. Not in our lifetime, but fishing as we have known it is doomed. We have seen the decline begin, and it continues. My two bobs worth. Noel.
     
  11. creekboy

    creekboy Well-Known Member

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    A very sad affair. But, I guess we just have to live with it. Cheers, creekboy.
     
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  12. Madfisher

    Madfisher Active Member

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    Jim part of our trouble was stream improvement ie Willow removal. They where supposed to replant with natives, but never happened. The once glorious campbells river spoken of in glowing terms by John Hedge, now has no shade, and due to pine plantations on the headwaters most of the springs have dried up. I still stock the campbells below Chifley dam, where they compete with redfin and carp, although Cod and yellows are making and appreance in the better holes.
    ON a better note their has been a lot of soil erosion work done, and a lot of replanting of natives species around Bathurst.
     
  13. Madfisher

    Madfisher Active Member

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    Spot on Noel,every dam hobby farm has a pump in the river, shame they are not as keen on controlling their weeds.
    Cheers Pete
     
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  14. Sophia Grace

    Sophia Grace Member

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    This is important & remarkable post about Fly Fishing Carp. People should read this post to understand basic & important points for Fly Fishing Carp

    Thanks @Madfisher for sharing this nice post with us.
     
  15. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    ood to have you on board Sophie. Pete (Madfisher) has been around this site for a long time and is a good thinker.

    While it's not specifically about fly fishing or carp; I made a comment in a post above about rising sea levels, and how they may affect us. We arrived back on Monday after six weeks on the road including yet another three months stay in Darwin. Some home truths about this problem hit us pretty hard. We saw signs, erected by The Charles Darwin University, out on the Arnhem Hwy. The world famous and extremely valuable Arnhem Land wetlands, usually called the top end wetlands, are in great danger. This land is as flat as, well, flat. It is the collection and drainage area of the Mary River floodplain, and involves 13000sq. kilometres. Sea levels have already risen 130mm which sounds like not much. However, that means the salt water can already travel many kilometres inland, and barrages are being built to retain it. If it is permitted to flow into the wetlands, that will be the end of all vegetation and wildlife, in one of the planet's most valued sites.
    While it's easy to disregard rising levels as conjecture; it is very real indeed. And there's little we as individuals can do about it, other than ensure the powers to be are fully aware of the consequences. That may not achieve much either. Building a wall around the continent would cost our entire GDP, and then some, so that's not much help. IMG_1231A.jpg
    IMG_1232A.jpg

    Old fisho.
     
  16. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Oh dear, the agonies of aging. We were away over six MONTHS, not six weeks.
     
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  17. Madfisher

    Madfisher Active Member

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    Thanks Sophia, its nice to get some kudos. Have you tried flyfishing yet.
    Cheers Pete
     
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  18. Sophia Grace

    Sophia Grace Member

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