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Rod selection.

Discussion in 'Tackle Talk' started by diesel, Oct 10, 2017.

  1. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    I read an article recently written by Ian (Barra) Miller where he queried the selection criteria that we have adopted when choosing a fishing rod. We seem to have been steered towards putting too much emphasis on line rating by the rod manufacturers when it is not the most important box to tick.

    Ian suggests that even though the line rating needs to be considered, the two more important issues are whether the rod can handle the lures you intend to use and the fish you are targeting and I agree with him. Since taking up kayak fishing, I needed to re-equip myself with a couple of new rods and reels to suit this style of fishing (that’s my excuse anyway) and the boxes that I needed to tick were length of rod (not too long that I will get hung up in vegetation when fishing skinny creeks), being able to handles lightweight lures as low as 2g and also the capability of handling a bigger fish in the event of hooking one.

    If I think back to my early years of fishing and purchasing rods, I cannot recall line rating being part of the selection process, in fact, prior to the emergence of carbon/graphite rods, I do not recall ever owning a rod with a sticker saying that it had a line rating of 2-4kg or 6-10kg etc. We selected rods back then on whether we thought they were tough enough to handle the fish, not the line.

    Have we been ‘conditioned’ by the manufacturers into accepting that line rating is the first criterion that we should consider in the selection process and the rest becomes secondary? Has it become a marketing ploy to sell more rods? Am I thinking conspiracy here?

    In saying all this, I think I need a 1-3kg spin rod. Why? Because I don't have one :D

    Jeff :cool:
     
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  2. Ditch

    Ditch Active Member

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    I never take much notice of line or cast weight. My purchases are mainly based on length & the "feel" of a rod. If I pick it up & flick it back & forth a couple of times & like how it feels then thats what I go for. Little bit harder to do that with Graphite rods though, they don`t seem to feel the same as fiberglass until you put a lure or sinker on them, maybe thats were the line & cast weight come into play.

    As long as the rod suits the type of fishing I do then I`m happy with that.
     
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  3. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    We think along the same lines Ditch - old school.

    Jeff :cool:
     
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  4. reelaxation

    reelaxation Well-Known Member

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    I generally tend to stick to same kind of rods- so with that in mind I buy because it fits into my arsenal in terms of line weight and what I plan to use it for. I recently bought a ABU rod because of cast weight and I can throw weightless plastics a mile with it but its rated 1-5kg for line- but again I bought it for throwing literally unweighted or very lightly weighted lures like baby cranks, small minnows and stickbaits and plastics.
    For everything else I have pretty much all sizes and weights- so my UglyStik rods generally go in like 2-5kg, 4-8kg and 6-10kg and one 10-12kg for beach work, I am going to get a 9'0 2-6kg rod to run around 8lb braid on a 3500 batirunner (if the Mrs will buy it for me for xmas) and then I will have a decent mix of beach rods for all different line weights and target species.
    I am also keen on getting back into Alvey for the beach, so I am looking for a light 4-6wrap rod matched to a 500 series Alvey and 10lb mono and a heavy 9wrap to go with me 651c5 reel and running 30lb mono, these will go with my MT8144 SnyderGlas and 650A combo which runs 20lb mono ATM.
    Most of my graphite rods are the same- so I run a 1-5kg (really a 1-3kg) then I got a 2-4kg trion, a 3-6kg trion and a 4-7kg ABU and a 6-10kg trion which I bought when I had the boat for throwing big metals into salmon and taylor schools in sydney harbour and also for live baiting for flatties and jews- but in reality I only use the 1-5kg ABU because I can throw very light lures and the 3-6kg is my general plastics and spinning rod.

    I like to fill in the gaps in my gear as long as its practical to use- I have several heavier 8foot rods which I thought would be great for in close beach fishing but turned out they are just too heavy for smaller stuff like 'ting and bream and sont cast quite far enough for the bigger taylor and salmon. Most of them are like 6-8kg and 8-10 or 8-12kg better suited for bottom bashing in the boat or live baiting which neither I do a lot of any more, so the reels are still in good nick (many of them still new or used less than a handful of times) so I will just end up back-filling the gaps in my beach weapons sometime in the future.
     
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  5. Bluefin

    Bluefin Well-Known Member

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    Rods are a personal choice. It is all about how they make you feel. 2 years ago when I came up to Port Macquarie, I did my research and decided a TK3G 2 to 5 kg 1 to 9 gram would be perfect. And it was, so I thought for a while, great for sp's and hard body. Then the Jew and Bream Took a massive liking to the 10 gram vibliciuos soft vibe. Weight wasn't a problem. But the effort required to constantly lift the vibe against the soft tip bending took its toll. The second contender to the TK3G was the Daiwa Wicked Weasel. 2 to 6 kg 2 to 14 gram. It had a stiffer tip and at the time I preferred a little softer. Enter the Wicked Weasel into my Arsenal. It is Perfect with the soft vibes and has accounted for a few jew and everything else.Very light in weight. My fun stick has been a Shakespeare Slingshot 7' 1 to 3 kg. It just feels good ! I enjoy using it.Very light weight, and a lot of fun. Went fishing with our local guide one day, I always use his gear as it is a chance to try something new. I now have a Samaki Zing 6' 10" 2 to 4 kg 1/16 to 3/8. I liked it ok ! It is a stiffer rod, handles the soft vibes well, I love a fast taper for lifting fish. Handles Jewfish well. Im Happy. Howard.
     
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  6. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    I got myself a Zing 5'4" 2-5kg with the same lure rating as yours, Howard, that I have married to a Shimano Symetre 1000FL running 6lb mono.

    It looks like a kids outfit, but I couldn't have chosen a better combo for flicking unweighted soft plastics out of the kayak and it will handle some of the hard runners like sooty grunter up here in the north and it was fun with redfin down south last year. I have read a few negative comments on other forums about the Samaki Zing, but they get a good wrap from me. I think some blokes try to get more out of their gear than it was designed and made for and when it fails, they condemn the gear for not being up to scratch.

    Mate, I'm thinking about getting a 2 piece light surf rod around the 3-5kg, 10 to 11 feet mark to use with a 4000 size reel mainly for chasing flathead, whiting and bream in the close gutters. Is there anything you would recommend? Living out here in the sticks, the local tackle shops have a very limited range of beach gear (if any), so I will probably set my sights on buying a rod when I get to the coast or buy it online sight unseen, which is something I am reluctant to do. Buying a rod is like buying a good pair of boots - they have to fit.

    I do like Ugly Stik rods, Anthony, but have only ever owned shorties - what are the beach rods like?

    Jeff :cool:
     
  7. Bluefin

    Bluefin Well-Known Member

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    My wife and I have refined our beach rods over the years our light rods now are wilson live fibre 10’ 6.’’ 6 kg. Can throw a pilchard and reasonable sinker as well as a small ball sinker and worm . We think there perfect , 10 lb braid casts well
     

    Attached Files:

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  8. reelaxation

    reelaxation Well-Known Member

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    Hey Jeff,

    For the in close gutters I am using a 2-5kg UglyStik 8'0" matched to a 4000ST-DL baitrunner with 12lb braid, and I reckon its one of the best light beach rods Ive ever used. Has caught me everything from nice flatties up to 70cm and Salmon aswell as some big taylor, not to mention the bream and ting over the last few years. Great for throwing unweighted strip baits through to size 2/4 leads and bigger slab or live baits but enough grunt to stop good flatties and even soapie jews. There is also the SP1202M (12' 5-10kg) and the GB1002 (10' 6-10kg) both might end up being overkill so thats why I am looking at the 9' 2-6kg even though its not an UglyStik branded rod its a composite rod (Im not sure of the manufacturer but I saw i the other day at my tackle sponsors shop so I am guessing its possibly a Silstar or made in the same place as Silstar). I should be dropping over to grab some bait this week sometime so I will check it out and let you know the details.

    You could look at the Silstar below are their rods which would be suitable for what you want:
    PF-902NT 9'0" 2pc 2-4kg Nibble Tip
    PF-1002SFL 10'0" 2pc 4-6kg Surf Spin
    PF-1002SFM 10'0" 2pc 6-8kg Surf Spin

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers
    Anthony
     
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  9. Ditch

    Ditch Active Member

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    I have a 12 ft, 2 piece Ugly Stik "Diamond" with a 5 - 10 kg line weight & absolutely love the thing!.
     
  10. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the feedback Howard, Anthony & Ditch - gives me some ideas to work with.

    I've got an old Butterworth Pro Fisher 11'6" single piece hollow glass that I bought probably 30 years ago that went everywhere with me when I lived closer to the coast - a lot of strength down low with a reasonably light action. Lost count of the number of reels that I hung off it and the best would be a Penn Spinfisher V 4500 that is almost indestructible. The only drawback for me with the rod is that it is 1 piece which means that I have to carry it on the roof-rack, something I am trying to move away from. I've been tempted to attack it with a saw and make a 2 piece out of it, but just can't bring myself to committing such a vicious and blasphemous act to an old friend.

    Jeff :cool:
     

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