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Discussion in 'Chewing the fat' started by Old fisho, Jul 19, 2019.

  1. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Tonight around 2100, son Peter will arrive here with his two girls (12 and 21).
    The plan is to take them up the river tomorrow and if it goes to plan, the younger in particular one will have some fun catching whiting.
    Will hopefully have something to report tomorrow night. Noel.
     
  2. creekboy

    creekboy Well-Known Member

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    Hi,Noel. Best of luck for the family outing tomorrow. Cheers, Lyall.
     
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  3. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    The older one would like to come but is doing a uni course toward primary school teaching. The young lady is a stickler for doing the right thing and will spend the weekend studying. She (Natasha) is not bad as a fisher either but is also running two part time jobs. Her commitment is to be admired Noel.
     
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  4. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    The fishing day has been and gone. Yet again BoM got it all wrong as it has done so often. For about the tenth time in a row, winds to 27kmh were forecast, while we actually spent the day on silvery, glassy water and are not complaining at all. Seriously, the forecast has been miles off course, particularly with regard to wind during the past year, far more often than I've ever seen before. Perhaps there's a logical reason but I can't imagine what it might be. Anyway, it was delightful to be out there. We finally brought home nine whiting to about 38cm, after releasing at least half a dozen smaller ones, a bream, a tarwhine, and a couple of mullet. Grand daughter Ashlee managed to get a couple of whiting while doing it all herself and was pleased as punch. I was pleased too that she wants to come back and do it again. Boss and the older grand daughter phoned to say they were on the way to a new parking area and sand boat ramp by the river and we motored downstream and joined them with our lunch and coffees. Son Peter didn't fare so well, due at least in part to spending time helping Ashlee. Lovely day, some nice fishing and an interesting observation.
    I have long believed there is little difference between incoming and outgoing tides when fishing and considered my results would confirm that belief. During the previous two trips we have not had a fish on board until the tide started to run up. It happened again yesterday. But something I'd never seen before was occurring while watching a couple of small jellyfish and two or three leaves.
    We all know, or should know, that sea water is so-called, heavier, actually more dense than fresh or brackish water. Leaves and such were still drifting past the boat, going downstream, so the tide was still obviously still running out. The swirling of water at the boat was visual proof that the water was still moving. Slight bows in our fishing lines were still obvious too, as was the water creating tiny ripples against the line where it entered the water. But there was no questioning the fact that the jellyfish were moving upstream at what I considered the normal incoming tide speed. This could only mean that the more dense sea water was now running up the river but the top half a metre was still running out. At the same time the fish activity changed and we boated our first whiting. So, this was the third time in succession that we had not boated a fish until the tide started to run up. It was the first time I'd ever seen the water travelling in both directions at once and it could never be seen with ripples on the surface. Perhaps I've gone around the twist.
    Has anyone else encountered this or have any views on it? Noel.
     
  5. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    Noel, I have encountered this and it is known as a 'salt wedge' which occurs in some estuaries, but not all. If you do encounter it again, taste the surface layer and even though it will be slightly salty (brackish), it will not be as salty as normal seawater.

    When I was a kid, I often swam at a favourite spot where three creeks joined, one was freshwater from the Great Divide, one was warm water (fresh) from the power station and the third was tidal salt water. On an incoming tide, it was only the bottom layer of water in the column that was salty, the middle of the column was fresh and cold and the surface layer was warm from the power station. At the bottom of the runout tide, the entire column was fresh.

    Jeff
     
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  6. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    It's likely that it happens up in the river as a normal event Jeff
    but was not noticed by me as I'd not fished up there until this year. Prior, I always stayed on the lake proper.
    There is not a lot of tide flow up there-several kms from the entrance but down nearer the river/ocean entrance,
    the faster water turbulence probably mixes the two water types more quickly.
    I had never seen it in the lake and had been there hundreds of times.
    I was unaware that it had a specific name. Thank you.
    I like the new signature too Jeff.
     
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  7. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    It was one of those things where you were in the right spot at the right time, Noel. We are lucky to experience such events and good to see that you were observant enough to notice that it was happening, even if you did think you were going around the twist. :confused:

    Jeff
     
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  8. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Too many walk around with their eyes too tightly closed.
    There's a never ending line of things to see if you try to be a bit observant.
    Jeff, down here we read a fair bit about the seriousness of Qld's droughts and water shortages. Are you affected by this?
    Noel
     
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  9. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    We are on tank water for household use and have enough to see us through a couple of years without topping up and I cart bore water from the town standpipe for processing sapphires and for the vegie patch. The drought has lowered the water level in our local dam (Fairbairn) to less than 8% and most of the western rivers are nothing more than mud puddles. There are some rivers that are still fishable, but you have to travel far to find somewhere to chuck in a line - it's better to head east and fish that big puddle between us and South America.

    We are far better off up here than western NSW, the underground aquifers are still providing good water, but further south they are being drained by irrigators.

    As for the highly populated south eastern part of Qld, they don't seem to learn from past experience when it comes to water usage. People need to become water wise, not just in the worst drought effected areas, but right around the country - there is too much wastage and when it's gone, no amount of money can replace it.

    Jeff
     
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  10. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    I like the wisdom AKA as common sense in your last paragraph Jeff. There's lots of hype being thrown around about rubbish and waste. We hear it constantly. But nothing much added about water; even underground water and though there's lots of it, it has similarities to oil and gas. They were all collected or produced over millions of years. Nature can never replace any of the three at the rate humans are extracting them. Down here nobody has bright green lawns and nature strips any more. We have stage 1 restrictions as normal now as do many other shires and towns. In quite a few towns the facilities for washing down boats have been capped off. You can still wash down a boat after salty use, but of course it goes through your own meter now.
    It would be interested to see 'true' figures for the national benefit if we were to ban cotton growing. These people have developed a reputation for having little or no conscience about water use and will do anything to get access to more than their official quota. It's public knowledge that they have been stealing billions of litres of water for a long time. The crop itself requires massive amounts of water. Perhaps we don't need cotton growers here. We certainly don't need corrupt ones.
    Glad to hear you don't have any major issues apart from finding enough water in which to fish. I understand you are a fair distance from the salty stuff too.

    Regards, Noel.
     
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  11. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Just tried to find Fairbairn Dam on Google Earth but it takes me to Lake Maradoon near Gindie. I felt that was incorrect.
     
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  12. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    Fairbairn Dam & Lake Maraboon are the same place, Noel - it's one of those Qld things where the decision makers decided to give a location two names just to confuse the issue and it doesn't take much to confuse a Queenslander. Gindie is one of those 'whistle-stop' places, blink and you've missed it.

    You are correct in your words about cotton growers and water theft, but there is a bigger problem looming in the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area with the development of huge almond & walnut plantations. Nut trees need water all year long to survive and bear fruit, year after year, whereas cotton growing can be suspended in times of extreme drought - not that it is, but it can be.

    Jeff
     
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  13. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    I mentioned your post to Boss Jeff; her being more botanically minded than I. She tells me almonds are up among the biggest users of water on the planet; in the botanical world that is.
    Bill rang Tuesday. We went out yesterday in his boat and I hate it. It's a nice little old flair bowed Quintrex but is super light. A slight movement on board and it wobbles and dives around, particularly if the movement is near the bow which is my territory. By the day's end I am leg weary from continually adjusting to the rock and roll. Not there is no music played on board.
    In his finite wisdom, Bill opted to hit the Tuross Lake which has not been performing well. I would have preferred to go up the river where we've had good successes on whiting in particular.
    There was only one trailer at the ramp and we saw but two boats for the day. Obviously others had more brains than us.
    The breeze (not wind) came direct from the south pole and it was difficult to find shelter from it. It swirled around corners and into every bay we checked. To escape the wind and find some sun was delightful. Meantime fingers stung with the cold, especially if wet. Bill wanted some nippers. He took me to his spot a week or so ago and we never found one over 40mm long. I was horrified--Bill thought them good nippers. I took him to my spot, which I have not used for years and there was no indication that anyone else had been there for years. Bill hated it. It's more mud than sand and soft and sticky into the bargain. I admit it's hard to pump too.
    Bill had never seen so many big nippers before and one he described as the biggest he'd ever seen by far. I think he might go back.
    A bit later we decided to run out a bread trail for some gars. In the middle of the neap tides, our bread simply sank to the bottom and never moved. There was no tide flow. Abandon project one.
    We went to the main channel where the back system drains into the lower part of the lake and threw some SPs around for no result after about fifteen minutes. A couple of weeks ago I bought eight 42mm vibes on line ($20 for 8) and decided to give one a swim. They actually look good and swim perfectly. Opted to try a flouro-green thing which looked a bit gaudy. First cast brought a throw back flattie to the boat. Next cast was a surprise with a good keeper on the end of it. HEY!!!! "I like this" I said. It never caught another fish. Nor did the others I tried. Bill never touched a flattie all day.
    Off to drown a nipper or two. Total catch from that game was a fairly nice bream (Bill) a keeper flounder (Bloody Bill again) while Noel got a tiny snapper and a toad. We quit around 3.00pm and came home. There's little question our main lake is still in a sad state. This year, out there, has been my worst since I don't know when; perhaps ever.
    Since the repair job, the old girl (boat) has been doin' what it orta, as well as it ever did. Money well spent.
    Next week I may get up the river early perhaps. Later on we go to Merimbula for eight days. I suggested a week on Norfolk Island but Boss chose Merimbula. She has invited her sister and niece from Geelong and they are coming to join us for a few days. I have little say in it all. It' her 80th birthday present (Aug 5) and will perhaps be opff the air for a few days.
    Talk again soon. Noel.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2019
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  14. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    I thought blue was your go-to colour for lizards, Noel.

    A while back I bought a few packs of these Tsunami soft plastics in Big W, yet to try them, but they look like any fish in it's right mind would take a swipe at them.
    tsb%20blueback.jpg

    Jeff
     
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  15. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Hello Jeff.
    At the moment I'd use any colour to find myself a decent flathead. Almost forgotten what one looks like.
    I don't know that one you show at all but am sure flatties would be happy to make it breakfast, lunch or whatever. I'm not a fish but I love the colour.
    What's the length and weight of it?
    I no longer use many of the internally weighted plastics. The main reason is simple. Our waters here are generally shallow and around 1.8-2.1m. They can be fished with lighter stuff so I never get over 5grams. Our tide runs are not excessively fast either, apart from right at the entrance. That's not to suggest heavier ones don't still work.
    I do use quite a few Squidgies in blue, not there are many of the old colours left. A definite favourite has been their 'fireworks' in the wriggler version which I think has also been discontinued. It's a soft pale blue with a bit of internal sparkly stuff and I fish the 100mm one with 3 or 5gram jig heads. With the smaller sized plastics I go down to 2gram heads and sometimes even lighter. These are often used in half a metre of water. In such water we don't need 7-9gram weights to get down to the bottom. In fact you don't even have to reach the bottom. Everything in the water is within the fish's vision window. Have not used them for a while but have also had good fish on resin heads. These are super light and casting distance is short. In spite of that; they work well, particularly is shallows where sinking is not needed.
     
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  16. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    I just remembered; the colours of yours are in context, exactly the same as the old Squidgy flick bait in what they called 'pilly' colour. It was blue and white with black dots on the sides.
     
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  17. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    I've used those Squidgy pilly flick baits Noel, never had any success with them on flathead, but done well on queenies and threadfin salmon up here in the north off the beach and also picked up some Australian salmon with them in South Oz.

    I recall you writing once that your favourite 'blue' Squidgy was no longer available. What was it?

    Jeff
     
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  18. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. I've never done well with them either so did not mourn their passing. I did once nail two over 40 whiting on one, taking only three casts, and nothing since.
    That was the 'fireworks' of which I wrote.
     
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  19. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    There are times when you hope your intuitive instincts are correct. I have a suspicion that my suggestion of hiring boat at Merimbula and having a fish around the top lake had a reasonably favourable reception. I've been on the bottom lake often enough in blue water boats but they can't get above the causeway at the bottom of town. It's a lake well known for flatties and bream, with trevally quite common too.
    I looked on the net for detailed info about Merimbula Lake maps and came across numerous videos about using plastics for flathead. I of course had a look at some. A lot made sense, but some ideas and methods were bordering on comical to me. Doubtless they work for the people involved. But one thing stood out: The vast majority cast right handed and also wind right handed. I simply don't understand the endless changing of hands to do this. It takes only a handful of casts to adjust to winding left handed. Read that as right handed if you cast left handed. I see it this way.
    I am seriously right hand dominant. I cast and do all manner of things using my right hand. Of course that means my left hand is not as finely tuned to such activities. I then ask myself one question. Why would I trust the control of my best fish to my least capable hand. Easy; I don't. I cast right handed, control my fish with the same, and wind a handle to put line on a reel
    with my left hand,
    which has little else to do with actually fishing.
    I guess if you are bait fishing and the rod spends most of its time in or on a rest then it matters little. But for those who cast lures and flies; I'm amazed they don't/won't make the change for the improved efficiency when considering the number of casts made some days.
    How do you guys out there see this?
    Noel
     
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  20. blair

    blair Well-Known Member

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    I seen the water flowing in 2 directions for the first time at big finnis river and wondered what was going on, was an undetectable fish or crab taking line against he runout? the guide pointed out that there had been a lot of rain recently, so 2 layers of water. In all my years of fishing I thought I would have noticed this before.
    I have found willy wheather good for wind forecasts Noel and I don't mean hang out the old chap to sense the wind direction and wheather conditions either!
    4 day colour forecast is reliable for rain forecasts.
    For flatties around here lures whith red, bright pink or red and black contrast get eaten also white, in my youth if someone told me a fish would take a hot pink lure I would not believe them. good of u to give a little Noel and go out in your mates inferior boat. I love my webster bass master super stable etc.
    Any one got ideas on stopping the steering cables jamming up and how to fix them other than dissembling them frequently and lubing , lubing can react whith factory lube as well causing seizures , I know cable probably had it once rusted, mines starting to go probably on its 3rd one now.
     
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