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Not your average moggy!

Discussion in 'Chewing the fat' started by Rod Bender, May 27, 2020.

  1. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    blair, creekboy, Old fisho and 2 others like this.
  2. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    I've been waging war against feral cats for many years Jim and I have caught some that make domestic moggys look like kittens.

    I have a competition going with a neighbour to see who can catch the most over a 12 month period and 2 years ago I trapped 35 of the disease ridden barstard animals. If I catch one with a collar, I spray fluro orange paint on it's back and let it go back to it's owner with a note tied to the collar which reads: 'next time I find it on my place you will only get the collar back'. They still let them roam overnight.

    Jeff
     
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  3. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    A dog will bear it's teeth at you from a distance to let you know it's not to be messed with, but a cat waits until you are in close and then lashes out when you don't expect it - evil creatures.

    Just look at this one that I caught, looks nice and friendly and as soon as I picked up the trap it went nuts - evil creatures I tell you.

    085) Cat in cage.jpg
    I've learned from experience that when a cat starts to flatten down it's ears, it is about to let loose with full on fury.

    Evil creatures that need to be controlled with extreme prejudice.

    Jeff
     
  4. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    A few years ago we trapped several at Eucumbene. As Jeff says, the size of some is incredible. We got one while spotlighting one night and it was as big as a small fox. I rate them as the most dangerous animal I've encountered. If it gets to that point, the teeth are worse than their claws. We used to give them a .22 lead while in the cage. I read some time ago that all feral cats, after three generations, revert back to their original tabby colour of centuries ago. All the variations we see today have been bred into them. We noted then that the biggest we caught were in fact always tabbies.
    Actually enjoyed taking some of them out. They do tremendous damage in the wild. Birds, animals, lizards; they'll kill them all.
    Noel
     
  5. blair

    blair Well-Known Member

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    I usually see feral cats when fishing at eucenbene if I see one on a hunting trip it will most likley get a pill from my 22 250 if it doesn't make make itself scarce quickly which they are good at.
    Last year on a hunting trip we came across a freshly dead wild horse which looked healthy otherwise, quite muscley whith a good coat, it had all the meat eaten off its neck.
    We wondered what killed it there were no horse culls going on couldn't see any bullet holes in it , I went for a circuit to see if I could find what had been eating it I presumed a pack of wild dogs or pigs, about 40 meters away on the edge of semi clearing as i walked past, one not small animal not a horse either moved off it wasn't a pig they sort of smash through the bush the screen of bushed was too thick to see what it was and it was not possible to follow it and try and sneak up on it I would make too much noise and a bit unsafe. I presumed it was a large dog but something did not feel right.
    A year earlier In the same area on a solo hunt I had a horrible feeling I was being followed / stalked by something I have a dog whith me now while hunting.
    I seen that puma documentary a week or so ago and they eat the meat of the preys necks apparently. If there is a puma there I hope I see it before it sees me which would be unlikely but my dog might smell it first she is good at sensing game.
    I might need a bigger gun as well. Have been drooling over a lightweight .308 .

    Goat: great white hunter maybe bag 1st puma or be turned into puma kaka.
     
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  6. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    I often wonder about these sightings. I tend to reject the possibility yet they keep coming. They span many years now and that must have required breeding. That means more than one and in the mountains, finding only one female up there would be a challenge so it suggests a reasonable number are needed to survive. Have there been any photographed footprints? I'm not aware of any and for much of the year prints would remain in the snow.
    Noel
     
  7. blair

    blair Well-Known Member

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    I heard one was seen above tantangra up the the bidgee, I seen something in the distance not far away near nace not sure what was but looked like a big cat and moved like one.
     
  8. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    I have read, and I know nothing, that sightings have been seen of black ones. If so, they would likely be panthers rather than puma which are a brownish colour and not dark at all. They can also be 6-8' long and weigh around 100lbs
     
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  9. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    A few abbreviated comments from a 'Weekend Australian' paper this morning.
    Cat's cleanliness could now be their undoing. Scientists have developed a device that recognises a passing cat and sprays poison on itself. When the feral licks it, it dies. It does not confuse with anything else but cats. A six week trial had 100% success. Twenty devices were scattered around 2600ha and killed 33 ferals; 2/3 of the known population. Study says no other method is as effective, other than man with gun. Feral cats, which can reach twice the size of domestics are responsible for most of 34 mammal extinctions since 1788. Studies indicate they could be killing 75 million native animals, including birds, reptiles, bilbies, bettongs and quolls-----every night.
    Best news I've read in a long time.
    Noel
     
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