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Slugs and Snails.

Discussion in 'Chewing the fat' started by Master Baiter, Jan 4, 2020.

  1. Master Baiter

    Master Baiter Well-Known Member

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    Off for a Fish today as I have to use the Bait I collected yesterday. I was after a Snake that went in behind all these Terracotta pots that had been there for years. Pulling them out They were covered in Snails and Slugs and seeing as the Brown must have squeezed in between a pile of bricks and there was no way that I was pulling them out and putting back so he will live another day or two.
    Having collected a 1 litre Ice cream container full of both more to remove them than use that many , I shall now head off to the Lake. I use to use them quite often but getting a few in one go was hard to do. I fish the Slugs with a size 6 hook by inserting it just in from the tail along the top and out the back. Snails crush shell but leave shell on use same a size 6 hook .
    Yes they are great Bait's I dont know why they are not used at all.
    Wally
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2020
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  2. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    Good info Wally. I would never have considered them as bait, especially snails, but why not?

    Jeff
     
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  3. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Have never heard of anyone using them but I have to say, why not?
    Frankly, I don't like slugs in any shape or form, even handling them but have eaten snails quite a few times, (escargot in garlic butter) and they are much like a tougher oyster but of course they were not common garden snails. Been fed a bit differently no doubt (I hope).
    Noel
    Gastronomic purveyor
     
  4. Madfisher

    Madfisher Well-Known Member

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    I have heard of people using snails to catch catfish, so i guess they would work. Good Luck.
    Cheers Pete
     
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  5. Master Baiter

    Master Baiter Well-Known Member

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    Well the most exciting part of my session of 2.5 hrs was catching a 470mm and a 320mm Carp on a new Rod and Reel I bought before Xmas. A Rapala Maxwell 2 4kg Rod and a Okuma Ceymar 2500 Reel spooled with 6lb Suffix Advance Mono line. I thought how flimsy the Rod looked when I first saw it but I caught a big Carp on it before Xmas. Now I feel confident in casting my running no 2 ball sinker knowing i am not going to break the Rod unless the line is wrapped around the end lol. Plus I am confident in holding it up almost vertical with the right drag setting of course.
    Anyway 3 Carp all on Slugs recommended to Bender and Carpo. Nothing touched the Snails but I guess they don't see them on the Lake floor, so best suited to grassy weedy areas.
    I fish them with gloves today no exception but they are finger and Thumb less making it difficult to hook.
    Plus don't let the slime dry on your hands it will last a few days. I wash the slime with WD 40 they cLean up in a day or so. moral here is wear surgical gloves Strong and thin.
    Wally
     
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  6. CornaCarpio

    CornaCarpio Well-Known Member

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    I remember having a polystyrene box filled with worms that I used to take fishing with me when I was a kid. One day, after I exhausted all the worms, I started using the snails and slugs that were in the box. I caught a heap of Carp on them. I tried the slugs and snails next time I went fishing and never caught a thing...
     
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  7. blair

    blair Well-Known Member

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    Never have tried them . Have heard that crickets work good for trout at night.
     
  8. kev209

    kev209 Well-Known Member

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    I used to get my crickets from the local pet shop at that stage they were about $5 a punnet.
     
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  9. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    If you leave snails in polystyrene too long they eat their way out. Have seen it happen.
    One of my mates owns a pet shop Kev. I've seen him take trout at Eucumbene on them during a sunny day. Fished 3/4 of a metre under a bubble float.
     
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  10. kev209

    kev209 Well-Known Member

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    I could never get black crickets, they were always a brown color
     
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  11. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    These are the words of Lance Wedlick taken from page 4 of his book '60 Ways To Fool a Trout'.

    'The black cricket is second only to the grasshopper for late summer and autumn feeding trout. One thing you can be certain of when you are fishing a black cricket; the trout you catch will invariably be big ones.
    On a summer's evening when the last thread of light retreats from the ground the black crickets emerge from beneath the logs and rocks and from the cracks in the dry earth and they scramble down to the river.'


    I have no idea if there is truth in what Mr Wedlick wrote, but from somebody like me who has never caught a trout it sounds feasible.

    Jeff
     
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  12. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    That book's been around a long time now Jeff. I can't agree with the way he suggests you'll only catch big fish. I thing that's over generalising. Otherwise, what he writes is pretty much on the ball. I see it as almost identical to mudeyes doing it in reverse. Crickets go TO the water, while mudeyes come FROM the water to hatch. Both kick along the surface in a similar fashion. This leaves a little bit of wake on still water that would be quite visible to a fish looking for a feed. Don't know why crickets go to the water unless they have to drink like the rest of us.
    Noel
    Who doesn't know mud?? from clay about it.
     
  13. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    Noel, he goes on to suggest that the crickets may have fallen in or been washed in by a sudden downpour. I have often found black crickets in my dog's water dish when I go to top it up in the morning which suggests that they do indeed seek water under the cover of darkness.

    I agree with your comment re only catching big fish and maybe he was just lucky enough to catch big fish and no small fish on the occasions that he used crickets - a different era, more bigger fish available, who knows.

    Jeff
     
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  14. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Jeff,
    If they were such effective trout takers, I'd be surprised if the only ones in the water were washed in. If there was enough rain to do that, based on my limited experience, the lake shores would be so slippery and muddy it would be difficult to fish. But then, if wading along the shore, nothing would change. That was the way we once fished Eucumbene.
    There's little doubt that says it all. In those incredible days for the likes of Eucumbene and Pedder in Tasmania, fish ten pound and way over that were common. Actually the same can be said of NZ's Tongariro River. I spent a night with an old chap called Jim Ross, who would now be dead. His daughter Sally used to fish the river and stayed at the same lodge as us. She usually joined us for drinks and yarns. Sally drove me to her place at Palmerston North one afternoon to meet the old chap as he was way back then. He fished that river before there were power stations built and the river was so wild it killed several blokes every year. There were few cars and they used horses to travel along the river with their old greenheart rods of about 12-14 long. He spoke (in between slugs of my Glenfidich single malt scotch) of ten pound fish being not worthy of talking about over a beer. Fifteen pound usually rated a bit of discussion, while you openly skited about twenty pounders.
    One of my greatest regrets in life is not recording what he told me. What wonderful stories they were and I think they rate among the high points in my fishing life. At about 75 at the time, he was still going strong at 2.00am. Then Sally drove me back along what is called the desert road, which also goes to the Rhuaphue ski fields. Have forgotten the Kiwi spelling of some of those places. It's actually alpine desert and is often snowed in. On the way back to the lodge, Sally told me she was in the hospitality industry. After a few more questions she said 'Well, actually I'm a hooker but I never tell anyone unless I'm looking for a bit for myself'. Not being fancy free at the time I resisted the kind offer from this most elegant lady?? She said Australian blokes she 'worked with' were rough and crude. We were considered the only gentlemanly Australians she'd met and obviously enjoyed our, what we thought was a bit wild at times, company. I hoped she did better somewhere else. I still have a lovely plaque she gave me when she came over here with her new bloke a year or so later.
    Such is the life of a most ordinary fisherman.
    Noel
    Sorry for derailing the post but got nostalgically carried away.
    PS. Fishing memories are made of many different experiences.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2020
  15. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Peter just came in to tell me all except a couple of the famous Australian alpine huts have been lost to fire. Several of these historical huts, that saved the life of many people lost in snowstorms etcetera, were burned back in 1993. Most were rebuilt because of their historical significance. Almost all have gone this time and they are trying to save the last couple of them. As you could imagine, they are in isolated and mostly rugged high country. We have often fished the Eucumbene River after the long walk down the valley slope at Sawyers hut. It was one that was rebuilt. Would you believe it's three times as far going back after walking the river for a few hours. Well, it certainly felt like it.
    Peter and his girls visited a couple of huts closer to the road only a couple of months ago and signed the visitor's books there.
    Noel
    This is sad news indeed.
    Jeff. Rethinking what I read about fishing crickets; Mr Wedlick says 'in summer', 'the crickets come out from under...……, and from cracks in the ground'. That doesn't gel with me when I read about them being washed in after rain. Sounds like the opposite in fact.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2020
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  16. Dickson

    Dickson Well-Known Member

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    There called dung beetles Kev;)
     
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  17. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    No need for any apology Noel, it's the off topic stories that make TBX a great forum.

    That is sad news indeed. I can remember a few huts from my younger years working in the high country and spent some nights in Oldfield's Hut after being caught in bad weather. The Oldfield family were well known for Bert, the Australian cricketer and I worked for a while with Gil Oldfield, Bert's nephew.

    Oldfields Hut.JPG
    Oldfield's Hut.

    Rolly's Hut was another that I remember well and read somewhere a few years back that it had been destroyed by fire.

    Rolly's Hut.jpg
    Rolly's Hut.

    Both of these huts were in the Orroral Valley, now part of Namadgi National Park.

    Jeff
     
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  18. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    I haven't sourced the information yet Jeff, but those two may be still there. I didn't think the fire had extended far into Namadgi yet. If I find out I'll let you know. It's still out of control and as you would well know, some of it up there is difficult country in which to fight a major fire.
    Noel.
     
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  19. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    I vaguely remember either reading an article or talking to someone about the subject of trout eating snails. That's trout that eat snails, not snails that eat trout!:cool:
    I have fished crickets during the day and caught small trout. Have also caught redfin on them...at least 1 redfin anyway. I have no doubt that any smallish predatory fish will eat crickets! I would think a carp would take a cricket as well.
    Cheers
    Team Bender
    Big cricket fan!!!
     
  20. Master Baiter

    Master Baiter Well-Known Member

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    Well I am only going to Slug it out next time, even if I only get a Carp.
    Wally
     
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